Tutors & Study Aids

There are so many resources available to you if you’re having a hard time in one of your classes or just need some extra help before a test.

Before you panic, ask yourself: am I doing everything I can? If the answer is no, then consider the following options:

1. Visit the learning center on campus

Your university has numerous FREE resources available to you if you need a tutor or if you just need someone to look over your homework. Most campuses have a Spanish or language lab, a math lab, a writing lab, and often a science lab with student tutors available throughout the week. Set up an appointment and ask any questions you may have. A lot of professors will give extra credit if you show proof that you visited the learning center.

2. Ask classmates

Before you go to the professor with questions, ask your classmates. If you missed a class or two because you were sick, get the notes from someone in the class that you know pays attention and takes good notes.

3. Meet with your professor during office hours

Check your syllabus to see when your professor has open office hours. It’s still a good idea to email them in advance or talk to them after class to set up a time. It would suck to walk all the way across campus to realize they stepped out for lunch or already have a meeting with another student. If you are having a hard time in class but your professor sees you trying and meets with you during office hours, they’ll be more flexible if you don’t do so hot on an exam because they know you put in an effort.

4. Study groups

A great way to prepare for tests or to get help on difficult material is to set up a study group with classmates or other students that are taking the same courses. Another great way to learn the material is by teaching it to others, so study groups are helpful for everyone involved. Here are some helpful tips for getting a study group together.

  This resource is presented by Kaplan Test Prep, offering test preparation, practice tests and private tutoring for more than 90 standardized tests, including SAT, GRE, GMAT, LSAT, USMLE & NCLEX.

Share This Article